MISSION —

We work at the intersection of design, chemistry, and biology to provide a radically sustainable material for everyone and every need.

Making the next generation of textiles

Developed in collaboration with nature, we create materials through our bio-based design process that emphasizes circular manufacturing and diligence to uphold safety throughout our manufacturing process.

No Toxins

No Tanning

No Petrochemicals

No Plastic

Biodegradable

Making the next generation of textiles

Developed in collaboration with nature, we create materials through our bio-based design process that emphasizes circular manufacturing and diligence to uphold safety throughout our manufacturing process.

Biodegradable

No Petrochemicals

No Plastic

No Tanning

No Toxins

We have a problem with Waste

We have a problem with Waste

The Fashion Industry

We've created a world, economy, and lifestyle that is dependent on many different types of pollution. This problem is even more significant within the realm of clothing. The fashion industry represents 10% of all emissions, which means more emissions than all plane and boat shipping worldwide. Clothes are essential to every culture and society, but how we consume them has gone too far. The fashion industry is among the largest polluting industries in the world.
This issue can be broken into four main issues:

water

Textile dyeing makes up one-fifth of the world's industrial water pollution, second only to the water-polluting practices of industrial sewage management. Textile dyeing and producing heavily contribute to this problem, both because of the amount of consumption and the toxicity of pollutants that are fed back into waterways.

EMMISIONS

Today, 62% of all textiles are made from synthetics. These synthetics are a type of plastic made from about 55% fossil fuel-based materials that contribute significantly to global emissions. Emissions are the main cause of global warming and continue to be a massive problem for the fashion industry.

MICROPLASTICS

Microplastics highlight this issue since they constitute 31% of all plastic pollution. They are commonly discharged by household washing machines that dislodge microplastics from your everyday items like polyester pants or nylon stockings.

HUMAN HEALTH

The fashion industry has a long history of exploiting workers and damaging communities, particularly in the global south. So, western countries have started outsourcing their poor labor practices to developing nations that do not have the resources to oversee UN compliant business practices.

The Fashion Industry

We've created a world, economy, and lifestyle that are dependent on many different types of pollution. This problem is even more significant within the realm of clothing. The fashion industry represents 10% of all emissions, making up more emissions than all plane and boat shipping produces worldwide. Clothes are essential to every culture and society, but how we consume them has gone too far. The fashion industry is now among the largest polluting industries in the world.

This problem can be broken into four main issues:

water

Textile dyeing makes up one-fifth of the world's industrial water pollution, second only to the water-polluting practices of industrial sewage management. Textile dyeing and producing heavily contribute to this problem, both because of the amount of consumption and the toxicity of pollutants that are fed back into waterways.

EMISsIONS

Today, 62% of all textiles are made from synthetics. These synthetics are a type of plastic made from about 55% fossil fuel-based materials that contribute significantly to global emissions. Emissions are the main cause of global warming and continue to be a massive problem for the fashion industry.

MICROPLASTICS

Microplastics highlight this issue since they constitute 31% of all plastic pollution. They are commonly discharged by household washing machines that dislodge microplastics from your everyday items like polyester pants or nylon stockings.

HUMAN HEALTH

The fashion industry has a long history of exploiting workers and damaging communities, particularly in the Global South. Western countries have started outsourcing their poor labor practices to developing nations that do not have the resources to oversee UN compliant business practices.

The TômTex Solution

The Science

The spectacular natural architecture of the Chitin itself inspired us for our bio-based fabric.

At TômTex, we don't have to worry about this because we let our materials guide us. Using water-based green chemistry, we develop textiles based on the possibilities of their raw materials. The spectacular natural architecture of the shrimp shell itself inspired us for our bio-based fabric.

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THE PEOPLE

We invest time in a rigorous and transparent supply chain, understanding that so much pollution and poor work practices fall on the Global South.

We intentionally pick partners that follow our same ethos of ecological care and fair employment practices. We track these standards across our supply chain, going all the way back before the chitosan manufacturers, before waste collection, and even before the shrimp and seafood are eaten, to the shrimp farms where we confirm that shrimp are grown sustainably and by farmers who have fair treatment.

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A circular manufacturing system takes into account the end-of-life of a product. Circularity is derived from natural and indigenous lifeways, taking inspiration from how nature recaptures everything. It acknowledges that "waste" is an idea that humans came up with. In nature, there is no waste because everything is used.

In nature, after a commodity serves its purpose and is discarded, it can be reabsorbed into the environment without harming anything or anyone. This is what TômTex does.

But what can you do?

You can contribute to this work by supporting our business and other institutions emphasizing circular manufacturing and environmentally-focused development.
Support local politicians whose policies help reduce textile pollution. For example, the French Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) policy holds companies and producers accountable for the treatment and disposal of their products. In 2016, over 90% of the trash collected was reused (59.4%) or recycled (31.8%). In addition, 97% of retailers in France are legally compliant with the EPR. Policies like this can significantly impact the number of textiles entering landfills annually.
Find local recycling programs. Check your local authority website or collection leaflet for specific instructions on recycling certain items. DonateNYC, RefashionNYC.
Repurpose old clothes. Sell or donate wearable garments instead of throwing them away. Get creative with some sewing skills. You can turn t-shirts into rags, masks, or headbands. For instance, one way to repurpose old sweaters is to create blankets or socks. Also, donating them to art/fashion schools is an excellent way to repurpose clothing.
Advocate to cease second-hand exports by Western, more developed nations through protests, petitions, and by supporting politicians and legislation that stops these practices. Over the years, the used clothing global trade has reached $4.6 billion, with developing countries often getting the short end of the stick because Western nations are better equipped to handle certain chemicals found in many garments. In 2018, the U.S. exported nearly 1.58 billion pounds of secondhand clothing, with Africa and South Asia receiving the most. Many countries continue this unfair trade for fear of sanctions.
Purchase from brands that promote extending the life of their products by offering to recycle them for you and giving discounts for the next shopping trip. As consumers, we have the power to change market demands.
Learn more about the marketing gimmick green washing and how to spot it. Greenwashing is a marketing scam that targets environmentally sensitive customers. To spot a fraudulent organization that promotes itself as sustainable is to look out for the seven deadly sins of greenwashing listed in Eco World; vagueness, suggestive imagery, irrelevance, hidden trade-offs, no proof, lesser of two evils, and fibbing.
Support programs that promote regenerative practices in community, at home, and in all parts of life.
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